You can browse all project descriptions (below), or narrow the search results by selecting one or more filters (topic area, client, etc.).

Client:
Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board
Year:
2017, 2016

As a continuation of previous work, Synapse provided NS UARB with consulting services on energy efficiency issues. Specifically, Synapse provided technical support and analysis with respect to rate and bill impacts, low-income program participation and performance, methodology to determine program incentives, and benefits of location-specific efficiency targeting.

Related Publication(s)
Comments on CLEAResult EfficiencyOne Incentive Setting Methodology Report
Reply Comments on CLEAResult EfficiencyOne Incentive Setting Methodology
Comments on Revised CLEAResult EfficiencyOne Incentive Setting Methodology
Comments on EfficiencyOne 2016 Rate and Bill Impact Analysis
Comments on Efficiency Nova Scotia 2017 DSM Progress Report
Client:
Maryland Office of the People's Counsel
Year:
2017

The Maryland Office of People’s Counsel retained Synapse to review the independent assessment of two offshore wind applications before the Maryland Public Service Commission in Case 9431. The two proposals under consideration are from US Wind for a 248 MW wind farm and Deepwater Wind for a 120 MW wind farm. Maryland's Offshore Renewable Energy Credit legislation establishes administrative thresholds for each offshore wind application and evaluation criteria for the Commission to use in its review. Synapse reviewed the findings, inputs, and calculations of the independent assessment and the two applications to provide recommendations regarding the renewable energy credit payments, ratepayer impacts, economic impacts, and net benefits attributed to each proposed project. Max Chang submitted testimony on behalf of MD OPC in March 2017.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Max Chang Regarding Offshore Wind Proposals in Maryland
Client:
Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources
Year:
2018, 2017, 2016

Massachusetts’ Green Communities program helps the state’s 351 cities and towns find and successfully implement clean energy solutions. To receive Green Community designation, communities must develop and implement a plan to reduce energy use by 20 percent within five years and meet additional criteria including allowing for permitting and siting of renewable energy, purchasing fuel-efficient and alternative fuel vehicles, and adopting more stringent building codes. The Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources engaged Synapse to review Green Community Annual Reports, verify whether municipalities have reached their 20 percent energy reduction goal, and develop a Progress Report for the program highlighting achievements to date. Synapse also identified strategies that are effective across towns and made recommendations to continue to advance and improve the program. Synapse developed the Green Communities Program 2016 Progress Report, available here, and provided updated analysis for 2017 and 2018.

Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2018, 2017

Synapse reviewed the analysis conducted by Idaho Power Company (IPC) in support of its 2017 Integrated Resource Plan. In comments submitted on behalf of Sierra Club, Synapse identified concerns including a lack of rigorous modeling, the selection of an illegal resource plan, under-statement of  future coal unit costs, and the lack of rigorous evaluation of the economic status of existing IPC coal units. Synapse recommended that IPC conduct optimization modeling in future IRPs, and fully assess the status of its Jim Bridger coal plant with respect to reasonable alternatives.

Related Publication(s)
Sierra Club Redacted Comments on Idaho Power 2017 IRP
Sierra Club Final Comments on Idaho Power Company's 2017 IRP
Client:
Not Another Power Plant, Sierra Club
Year:
2017, 2016

On behalf of Not Another Power Plant and Sierra Club, Synapse’s Bob Fagan submitted Direct and Surrebuttal expert testimony to the Connecticut Siting Council regarding the Killingly Energy Center, a 550 MW combined cycle power plant proposed for Killingly, Connecticut. He testified at two separate Siting Council hearings concerning the proposed plant. Mr. Fagan’s testimony clearly demonstrated that there are no short-term or longer-term reliability needs for the proposed plant. Further, increased renewable resources and energy efficiency required to meet increasing greenhouse gas emission limits will provide more than sufficient energy and capacity to meet reliability needs.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Bob Fagan Regarding Proposed Killingly Energy Center
Surrebuttal Testimony of Bob Fagan Regarding Proposed Killingly Energy Center
Client:
Maine Office of the Public Advocate
Year:
2018, 2017

Maine’s low-income residents, like those throughout the United States, face higher energy burdens (i.e., spend proportionally more of their budgets on electricity and heating fuels) than other residents. While Maine has addressed this disparity through various measures for decades, the state and other relevant entities can act more effectively by gaining a better understanding of how and where this disparity tends to strike. With this in mind, the Maine Office of the Public Advocate commissioned a study by Synapse Energy Economics (Synapse) to shed light on the energy burdens faced by Maine’s residents. The resulting report describes Synapse’s findings on energy use in homes. We relied on various publicly available federal data sources such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Low-Income Energy Affordability Data (LEAD) tool. We assessed differences in home energy expenditures by income bracket, by home ownership status, by type of heating fuel, and by county.  The analysis reveals that Maine’s low-income households have a high energy burden: The average (mean) home energy burden for low-income households is 19 percent. On average, low-income households in the state far exceed the thresholds for the various definitions of energy poverty (generally starting with a minimum energy burden in the range of 6 to 10 percent of household income).  In comparison, we find in our analysis that the average home energy burden for all Maine households is 6 percent.

Related Publication(s)
Maine Low-Income Home Energy Burden Study
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2017

Madison G&E is seeking to build 66 MW of wind in Iowa in Docket 3270-CE-127. Synapse provided expert testimony on behalf of Sierra Club regarding the Company's assumptions and modeling. Key questions included whether or not larger turbines or simply a larger project would have been more economic.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Ariel Horowitz Regarding Saratoga Wind Farm
Client:
Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board
Year:
2017

Synapse reviewed the Maritime Link Interim Cost Assessment. Specifically, Synapse analyzed the value of the Maritime Link asset to ratepayers given costs associated with a delay in delivery of energy via the Maritime Link. Further, Synapse assessed if the Maritime Link Project, approved by NS UARB in 2013, would be “used and useful.” Bob Fagan and Tyler Comings submitted joint direct testimony on these issues to the NS UARB.

Related Publication(s)
Joint Direct Testimony of Bob Fagan and Tyler Comings on Maritime Link Project
Client:
Conservation Law Foundation
Year:
2017

Synapse provided technical assistance and expert testimony on behalf of Conservation Law Foundation regarding the grid modernization plans of Eversource, National Grid, and Unitil in Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities dockets 15-120, 15-121, and 15-122. Synapse reviewed the methodologies and assumptions used by the companies in their plans. Synapse also assessed the extent to which the proposed plans meet the Department’s objectives for grid modernization, with particular focus on the plans’ incorporation of distributed energy resources as a key contributor to grid modernization.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Woolf and Horowitz on Grid Modernization Plans
Client:
Prince Edward Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission
Year:
2018, 2017

Maritime Electric finalized its Open Access Transmission Tariff. Synapse provided technical support to the Prince Edward Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission to assess the tariff's compliance with FERC open access principles. 

Related Publication(s)
Fair and Non-Discriminatory Transmission Access on Prince Edward Island
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2017

Sierra Club retained Synapse to review the draft parameters for Michigan’s impending IRP process proposed by the state’s governing agencies. Synapse found that, while most of the parameters were appropriate and up to standards for IRPs, Synapse identified a few areas in which changes could be beneficial for both planning participants and customers impacted by the IRP. Synapse’s comments to the Michigan Public Service Commission Staff outlined such changes, for example clarifying the relationship between the IRP process and the transmission and distribution and fuel planning processes; defining how utilities should select a preferred scenario; and modifying some modeling assumptions to better align with utility planning and ensure a more accurate, detailed, and robust analysis.

Related Publication(s)
Comments on Proposed MI IRP Parameters
Client:
Michigan Public Service Commission
Year:
2017

Synapse is assisting the Michigan Public Service Commission in the development of a strategy to comply with EPA’s Clean Power Plan. To support the state planning process and evaluate compliance options, Synapse has built a detailed representation of the regional electrical system in System Optimizer, a utility-scale capacity expansion model. The model optimizes specific electric generating unit build and retire decisions, cost-effective energy efficiency, unit retrofit decisions, emissions trading programs, and emissions targets through 2034. Synapse developed Michigan-specific inputs to the model in collaboration with staff of the Public Service Commission, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and the Michigan Agency for Energy. Synapse will use the model to test compliance plans developed by the joint agencies and stakeholders, including Michigan utilities, consumer, industry, and environmental groups.

Related Publication(s)
Michigan Compliance Assessment for the Clean Power Plan
Client:
World Bank
Year:
2018, 2017

On behalf of the World Bank, Synapse developed a transparent, user-friendly, Excel-based model that can estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions resulting from changes to electric-sector policies. It attempts to produce a reliable, documented estimate of GHG savings attributable to the initiative, suitable for use in international analysis and crediting of GHG reductions. This software tool is a power sector model, designed to examine effects of policies such as price changes, subsidies, and emissions taxes on the operation of an existing electric system. The current, first implementation of the model developed with stakeholder involvement from agencies in Morocco and is based on data and policy options that are specific to Morocco. The software is designed to be easily updated as new data become available. It is also readily adaptable to other countries in future implementations. Development of the tool itself, a user manual, and an internal report demonstrating the tool’s abilities were finalized in Spring 2018.

Client:
Home Performance Coalition
Year:
2017

Synapse worked for the National Efficiency Screening Project (NESP) to develop a National Standard Practice Manual (NSPM). The purpose of the NSPM is to improve the way that utility customer-funded electricity and natural gas energy efficiency resources are evaluated for cost-effectiveness throughout the United States and to inform decision-makers regarding which efficiency resources are in the public interest and what level of investment is appropriate. The NSPM updates and expands upon the California Standard Practice Manual and will provide the principles, concepts, and techniques for sound, unbiased evaluation of energy efficiency and other demand side resources. Synapse's primary role was as the lead technical consultant and was responsible for the overall drafting of the manual, managing the Drafting Committee of five experts, and incorporating input from the Review Committee.

Related Publication(s)
NSPM Presentation at NASUCA 2018 Mid-Year Meeting
Client:
Rhode Island Division of Public Utilities and Carriers
Year:
2018, 2017

Synapse is providing the Division of Public Utilities and Carriers with technical support for the National Grid rate case. The project includes expert testimony and addresses issues related to performance incentive mechanisms, multi-year rate plans, advanced metering, rate designs, and electric vehicles.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Tim Woolf on National Grid Rate Case
Testimony of Tim Woolf and Melissa Whited on National Grid Rate Case
Direct Testimony of Tim Woolf and Melissa Whited on Power Sector Transformation Proposals
Client:
New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission
Year:
2017, 2016

Synapse and Raab Associates provided technical and facilitation support to New Hampshire PUC staff for a stakeholder process to address grid modernization issues and policies for the state. Synapse assisted with developing agendas for stakeholder meetings, providing technical and policy analyses, and communicating the results of those analysis. After the stakeholder process, Synapse assisted with compiling initial and final reports with recommendations from the stakeholder group.

Related Publication(s)
Grid Modernization in New Hampshire
Client:
Advanced Energy Economy Institute
Year:
2017

Advanced Energy Economy Institute retained Synapse to review earnings adjustment mechanisms proposed by National Grid in New York. Earnings adjustment mechanisms provide performance incentives for utilities that better align utility performance with regulatory goals. Tim Woolf and Melissa Whited filed testimony before the New York Public Service Commission that provided recommendations regarding which performance incentive mechanisms to approve, as well as appropriate financial incentive allocations.

Synapse also prepared a report on state-wide performance incentive mechanisms for New York. The report examines some of the strengths and weaknesses of each of the three types of performance incentive mechanisms: outcome-based, program-based, and action-based. Because current efforts to implement performance incentive mechanisms in New York focus on outcome‐based mechanisms, the report provides an in-depth analysis of outcome-based performance incentives.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Woolf and Whited on National Grid EAM Proposal
Rebuttal Testimony of Woolf and Whited on National Grid EAM Proposal
Earnings Adjustment Mechanisms to Support New York REV Goals
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2017

Sierra Club retained Synapse to analyze Northern Indiana Public Service Company’s (NIPSO) request for rider on $400 million in capital costs at three coal-fired power plants in Indiana (Bailly, Michigan City, and Schahfer) as they seek to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) rule and Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELG). In this docket, NIPSCO seeks to retire four coal-fired units (Bailly 7 & 8 and Schahfer 17 & 18) while retaining three units (Schahfer 14 & 15 and Michigan City 12). Synapse assessed NIPSCO’s economic analysis and supporting “qualitative assessment” and examined whether the retention of the three units would be in the interest of ratepayers, and if the company’s qualitative assessment was reasonably constructed. Dr. Jeremy Fisher filed testimony demonstrating that NIPSO’s ratepayers see $200-$600 million in benefits with the incremental retirement of Schahfer 14 & 15 and that the Company’s application does not support the decision to install retrofits at the units.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Jeremy Fisher Regarding NIPSCO 2017 CPCN
Client:
Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board
Year:
2018, 2017

Review of the 2017 Nova Scotia Load Forecast.

Related Publication(s)
Evidence re the NSPI 2017 Load Forecast
Comments on NSPI Reply Evidence
Client:
Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board
Year:
2017, 2016

On behalf of Counsel to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (NSUARB), Synapse assessed Nova Scotia Power's (NSPI) advanced metering infrastructure pilot proposal. NSPI requested approval to deploy advanced (“smart”) meters to up to 1,000 customers at a cost of $8.2 million. Ms. Alice Napoleon identified multiple issues with the proposal, including, among other things, that the pilot period would neither provide sufficient time for data collection nor cover the period of highest system demand; that the pilot’s size was not adequately justified; that complementary programs to help customers experience the benefits from implementation of AMI were omitted; and that the proposed network for the pilot is not consistent with the network that may be required for full implementation. Ms. Napoleon concluded that the design of the proposed pilot would not provide a solid basis for determining whether the costs and benefits associated with AMI justify a full roll out. Ms. Napoleon recommended that NSUARB not approve the current pilot application based on the current record of evidence.

Related Publication(s)
Testimony of Alice Napoleon on NSPI Advanced Meter Infrastructure Pilot
Client:
Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board
Year:
2017

On behalf of Counsel to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (NSUARB), Synapse assessed Nova Scotia Power's (NSPI) advanced metering infrastructure pilot proposal in 2017. NSPI requested approval to deploy advanced (“smart”) meters to up to 1,000 customers at a cost of $8.2 million. Ms. Alice Napoleon identified multiple issues with the proposal, including, among other things, that the pilot period would neither provide sufficient time for data collection nor cover the period of highest system demand; that the pilot’s size was not adequately justified; that complementary programs to help customers experience the benefits from implementation of AMI were omitted; and that the proposed network for the pilot is not consistent with the network that may be required for full implementation. The evidence concluded that the design of the proposed pilot would not provide a solid basis for determining whether the costs and benefits associated with AMI justify a full roll out. Ms. Napoleon recommended that NSUARB not approve the current pilot application based on the current record of evidence. To address deficiencies identified by Ms. Napoleon and others, NSPI withdrew its initial AMI application and stated its intention to submit an amended filing.

In October, 2017, NSPI submitted an application to implement AMI throughout its service area. The application requested Board approval of a capital work order for $133 million to replace about 495,000 conventional meters with smart meters over the period 2018 to 2020. In early 2018, Alice Napoleon submitted evidence on behalf of the NSUARB regarding NSPI's proposal. Specifically, the evidence considered: 1. cost effectiveness of the proposal, including the magnitude of and support for claimed benefits such energy savings associated with critical peak pricing; 2. the reasonableness of allowing a return on the conventional meters to be replaced; and 3. coordination with the energy efficiency utility, EfficiencyOne, to enable benefits of the meters to be realized. In response to this evidence, NSPI submitted a sensitivity analysis to more fully consider the downside risks. The Board approved NSPI’s proposal subject to conditions but disallowed a return on the existing meters.

Related Publication(s)
Evidence of Alice Napoleon Regarding NS Power AMI
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2017

Synapse submitted formal comments to the Department of Energy regarding its use of the Federal Power Act to allow continued operation of the Yorktown coal units in Virginia. Dr. Ariel Horowitz drafted the comments, which focused on the lack of a sound alternatives analysis, the imprudence of relying on elderly and inefficient coal units for reliability purposes, and the need for a near-term plan to retire the units.

Related Publication(s)
Comments of Ariel Horowitz on Yorktown Alternatives
Client:
Utah Clean Energy
Year:
2017

Utah Clean Energy engaged Synapse to review Pacificorp’s proposal before the Utah Public Service Commission to alter its net metering compensation mechanism for residential customers with distributed generation. Melissa Whited submitted testimony to the Commission critiquing multiple aspects of the Company’s proposed distributed generation rate design. Synapse’s analysis of the bill impacts showed that the Company’s proposed changes would have a substantial negative impact on the adoption of residential solar. The proposed distributed generation tariff would essentially eliminate the economic advantage to residential customers of installing distributed generation. Further, the Company’s plan to move these net-metered customers into a separate rate class would increase costs to non-net metered customers. Whited also testified that demand charges are not appropriate for residential customers. Tim Woolf submitted testimony addressing the Company’s flawed cost-benefit analysis. Based on Synapse’s finding that the benefits of the Company’s existing net metering program surpass the costs, Mr. Woolf recommended that the Commission not approve the proposed changes.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Melissa Whited Regarding Pacificorp Net Metering
Direct Testimony of Tim Woolf Regarding Pacificorp Net Metering
Rebuttal Testimony of Tim Woolf Regarding Pacificorp Net Metering
Client:
Energy Freedom Coalition of America
Year:
2017

Synapse provided expert testimony in the Eversource rate case regarding the Company's proposed performance-based regulation (PBR) proposal and rate design modifications for net-metered customers. Synapse's rate design testimony addressed whether the Company had demonstrated a need for a Monthly Minimum Reliability Charge (MMRC), and whether the proposed MMRC would comport with the rate design goals of efficiency, simplicity, and continuity.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Woolf and Whited Regarding Eversource Rate Case
Surrebuttal Testimony of Woolf and Whited Regarding Eversource Rate Case
Supplemental Testimony of Woolf and Whited Regarding Eversource Rate Case
Client:
Lawrence Berkeley Labs
Year:
2017, 2016, 2015

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has prepared a series of technical reports on Future Electric Utility Regulation, which examine issues related to incremental and fundamental changes to electric industry regulation in a future with high distributed energy resource (DER) levels. Synapse provided research and analysis to support LBNL in producing a technical report on performance-based regulation in a high DER future. The report: summarizes the full suite of mechanisms used in various types of PBR; compares ratemaking and regulation of utilities under cost of service versus PBR paradigms; explains how to incorporate performance-based metrics focused on DER; presents key subtopics from the perspective of both the electric utility and the customer/broader public interest; describes a taxonomy of issues to consider in determining whether to implement some elements of PBR or comprehensive PBR; and describes criteria state utility commissions can consider to evaluate whether to adopt some form of PBR in the context of a high DER future. 

Related Publication(s)
Performance-Based Regulation in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future
Performance-Based Regulation in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future (webinar slides)
Client:
Alliance for Clean Energy New York
Year:
2018, 2017

Synapse was retained by the Alliance for Clean Energy New York to develop an analysis of the role of existing renewable generation in achieving New York’s goal of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. The report shows that so-called “Baseline” resources, which New York policymakers assumed would keep their energy and attributes in New York through 2030, have other markets for their production. If those resources are exported, New York would be forced to acquire substantial additional new renewable generation. Synapse analyzed policy options to compensate existing renewable resources for retaining their attributes in New York, and showed that they are less expensive than developing new renewable resources.

Related Publication(s)
Policies to Cost-Effectively Retain Existing Renewables in New York
Client:
Environmental Defense Fund
Year:
2018, 2017

With support from Environmental Defense Fund, Synapse convened a stakeholder advisory council and provided analysis to produce a vision of Ohio’s clean energy economic opportunities. The group—comprised of business leaders, manufacturers, academics, labor representatives, non-profits, and others—produced a shared vision report of how Ohio could create new jobs and economic growth by modernizing its energy economy. Essentially a business case for clean energy growth and innovation, the vision identifies multi-billion dollar opportunities related to attracting leading corporations, transforming transportation, building and deploying clean electricity and energy efficiency, and modernizing the grid, to demonstrate why Ohio is well-positioned to lead if it takes action. The vision also highlights the risks of failing to create conditions that allow Ohio businesses to compete on the national and global levels. After launching the shared vision on May 29, 2018, Synapse and the advisory group will use the report to engage additional Ohio stakeholders. Their combined input will add to a detailed roadmap of specific actions Ohio actors can take to achieve the vision. For more information, see www.poweringohio.org.

Read the report.

Client:
NA
Year:
2017

Kenji Takahashi presented on "Rhode Island Renewable Thermal Market Strategy -- An Analysis of Energy, Environmental, Economic, Energy Bill, and Local Job Impacts of an Alternative Renewable Thermal Energy Future for Rhode Island" at 2017 Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting Conference.

Paper Abstract

The thermal energy sector is a major consumer of energy for space heating and domestic hot water in Rhode Island. Relying primarily on fossil fuels, the thermal sector accounts for approximately one third of Rhode Island’s total energy consumption and carbon emissions. By diversifying the thermal energy sector to increase use of low-carbon renewable heating and cooling technologies (e.g., air  source heat pumps, ground source heat pumps, wood pellet heating, solar thermal), Rhode Island can make significant strides toward achieving GHG emission reduction goals and reap substantial  economic benefits in the process.

Thus far, virtually all clean energy policies and programs in the state have focused on electric sector technologies and natural gas efficiency. Consequently, Rhode Island’s renewable thermal industry has historically been relatively small and slow-growing.

To address barriers facing the renewable thermal industry and promote renewable thermal technologies, Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources (OER) tasked the authors with analyzing policies and programs designed to grow the industry and conducting a detailed market model of alternative thermal sector energy futures. In one of the alternative scenarios, Rhode Island achieves 5 percent  renewable thermal energy penetration by 2035. This paper presents the results and methodologies for analyzing this scenario, including the cost-effectiveness, energy rate and bill impacts, local job impacts, and emission impacts of the alternative future. This study broke new ground by applying standard analysis methodologies and approaches used for energy efficiency measures (e.g., cost-effectiveness tests, rate and bill impacts,  job impacts) to renewable thermal technologies.

Related Publication(s)
Rhode Island Renewable Thermal Market Strategy (EEDAL Presentation Slides)
Rhode Island Renewable Thermal Market Strategy (EEDAL Paper)
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2018, 2017

Sierra Club retained Synapse to assess the 2017 Integrated Resource Pan (IRP) filed by Puget Sound Energy (PSE). Synapse's review found that the PSE IRP included a reasonable near-term resource plan but contained proposed actions that could lead to an unjustified deviation from that resource plan. In addition, Synapse identified a series of unjustified assumptions and conclusions regarding renewable resource costs and availability and coal plant retirement dates that resulted in a biased long-term resource plan. In comments submitted to the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission, Synapse recommended that the Commission ensure full oversight of PSE's upcoming resource procurement processes and require PSE to use updated assumptions and enable full stakeholder participation in future IRP cycles.

Related Publication(s)
Comments on Puget Sound Energy's 2017 Integrated Resource Plan
Client:
Sierra Club
Year:
2017

Rappahannock Electric Cooperative (REC) has requested approval to increase its fixed access charges for residential customers (from $10 to $20) and small commercial customers (from $28 to $37). Sierra Club retained Synapse to develop testimony that establishes how these increases in fixed charges are inconsistent with fundamental ratemaking principles. In testimony before the Virginia State Corporation Commission, Melissa Whited addressed how the increases would provide inefficient prices signals, reduce customer equity, and reduce incentives for investments in distributed energy resources. Ms. Whited also recommended alternative methods REC could employ to address concerns about revenue sufficiency.

Related Publication(s)
Direct Testimony of Melissa Whited on REC Fixed Charges

Pages