Jennifer Kallay

Senior Associate

Jennifer Kallay
Education

MA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Boston University

BA Journalism, University of Maryland

Jenn Kallay has more than a decade of professional experience analyzing the benefits and costs of energy efficiency efforts for jurisdictions in the United States and Canada. Her work entails reviewing different regulatory approaches to spur energy efficiency; assessing the ability of utility energy efficiency plans to tap into cost-effective potential; evaluating energy efficiency components of integrated resource plans; researching best practice program designs and policies; analyzing energy efficiency as an alternative to new power plants; reviewing methods to account for energy efficiency in system planning; and conducting rate and bill impact, participant, and cost effectiveness analyses. Ms. Kallay provided energy efficiency data analysis and/or policy research and recommendations for programs in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Hawaii, Vermont, New Jersey, Arkansas, Minnesota, Virginia, Prince Edward’s Island, Ontario, and Nova Scotia. Her experience extends to national and international institutions including the Energy Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), International Energy Agency (IEA), American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), and International Energy Program Evaluation Conference (IEPEC). On two separate occasions, she participated in International Energy Agency workshops: one on energy efficiency markets and the other on benefits of energy efficiency. As an expert advisor, Ms. Kallay helped review and draft sections of IEA’s publication on the benefits of energy efficiency entitled “Capturing the Multiple Benefits of Energy Efficiency.”

From 2007 to 2016, Ms. Kallay supported the Cape Light Compact in assessing the impacts of its energy efficiency programs. Ms. Kallay supported the development of the Compact’s contribution to the first Massachusetts Three-Year Energy Efficiency Plan and associated Technical Reference Manuals, and she testified before the state’s Department of Public Utilities regarding the Compact’s projections of costs, savings, and benefits. In 2012, she coauthored Commercial & Industrial Customer Perspectives on Massachusetts Energy Efficiency Programs, a study that surveyed key energy efficiency stakeholders and Massachusetts businesses to inform the development of the second Three-Year Plan. Since 2012, Ms. Kallay has supported the Rhode Island Division of Ratepayer Advocate in assessing the impacts of utility energy efficiency plans and delivery strategies on customers and has testified before the state’s Public Utility Commission on several occasions regarding planned energy efficiency savings goals and costs.

Most recently, Ms. Kallay has focused on policies and practices states can use to increase energy efficiency adoption by traditionally hard-to-reach customers. She coauthored a handbook and fact sheet on strategies for mitigating equity concerns of energy efficiency programs and co-presented a webinar on this topic. She is also focused on strategies municipalities can use to reduce energy use. Before joining Synapse, Ms. Kallay worked for six years at Digitas, Inc. There, she developed quantitative analyses of marketing program performance to guide strategy. Ms. Kallay holds a MA in Energy and Environmental Analysis from Boston University and a BA in Journalism from the University of Maryland.

Selected Recent Publications

Fair, Abundant, and Low-Cost: A Handbook for Using Energy Efficiency in Clean Power Plan Compliance

Synapse Energy Economics for Energy Foundation, 2015

Authors: Jennifer Kallay, Kenji Takahashi, Alice Napoleon, Tim Woolf

Findings and Recommendations from Rhode Island Rate, Bill, and Participant Analysis

Synapse Energy Economics for Rhode Island Division of Public Utilities and Carriers, 2014

Authors: Tim Woolf, Jennifer Kallay

Opportunities to Ramp Up Low-Income Energy Efficiency to Meet State and National Climate Policy Goals

Synapse Energy Economics, 2016

Authors: Jennifer Kallay, Alice Napoleon, Max Chang