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Clean Energy for New York: Replacement Energy and Capacity Resources for the Indian Point Energy Center Under New York Clean Energy Standard (CES)

Synapse's Pat Knight was featured yesterday on WNPR's Next with John Dankosky. His interview, part of the Power Up segment, focused on our recently released report on natural gas. Listen here: https://nenc.news/podcast/episode-29-taking-leap/

Report: New England's Shrinking Need for Natural Gas

On February 6, 2017 Synapse released a report onNew England’s Shrinking Need for Natural Gas. ” This report examines the need for, and the cost of, the Access Northeast (ANE) natural gas pipeline.

Synapse celebrated the new year by welcoming two new staff members. We're thrilled to have them on the team.

Asa HopkinsDanielle Goldberg

On January 5, 2017, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released the 2017 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The final AEO 2017 contains projections of energy use from the electric power, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors through 2050 for the first time in AEO’s history. Publishing a new release just four months after the final AEO 2016, EIA has changed the way it produces its annual projections.

On December 16, 2016, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MA DEP) released historically stringent regulations to combat climate change.

Energy efficiency is a bargain, costing utilities less than $0.04 per kWh of saved energy. Larger programs are even cheaper, with average utility costs of $0.023 per saved kWh. That’s the message that emerges from a huge database of reports on efficiency programs, updated annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA).

Utilities and other energy efficiency providers submit annual reports on efficiency programs on EIA’s Form 861. We examined the total of more than 2,600 complete reports from 2010 to 2015. Key findings include:

Synapse is thrilled to announce the release of a new report, Show Me the Numbers: A Framework for Balanced Distributed Solar Policies.

Synapse recently created a dataset mapping the costs and savings from ratepayer-funded low-income electric efficiency programs against state poverty rates. We found that, despite the savings opportunities from low-income electric efficiency, states with a higher proportion of low-income residents than the United States average tend to spend less on these programs than states with a lower than average proportion of low-income residents. We also found that low-income energy efficiency does not cost more per kilowatt-hour saved in the states that spend more.

The inaugural Energy Efficiency Day has arrived! During this collaborative celebration, we’re highlighting the energy efficiency work happening at Synapse. Below are a few samples of our recent and ongoing efficiency projects. Follow #EEDay2016 on Twitter to learn more about the energy efficiency efforts of a wide range of organizations, companies, and individuals across the country.  

Advising Development of the National Energy Efficiency Registry

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