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decarbonization

Building decarbonization—particularly through widespread adoption of heat pumps for space and water heating—is now a central strategy for New York State to meet its climate targets. The installation of heat pumps can cost-effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector, but the timing of system replacements is crucial.

I recently had the opportunity to join a technical conference panel about electrification at FERC, where we primarily addressed the market and grid implications of building and transportation electrification.

In my pre-panel comments to FERC, I did not have a chance to address an important aspect of building decarbonization: the on-site carbon emissions vary a lot between buildings.

As local and state governments begin to make commitments toward a clean energy transition, it is vital that these entities establish detailed, data-driven plans to achieve their emissions reductions and other goals.

In 2014, the City of Burlington, Vermont became the first city in the United States to power itself on 100 percent renewable electricity. Synapse Energy Economics (Synapse) and Resource Systems Group (RSG) are proud to partner with the City to take its next big step, developing a roadmap to put the community on the best path to achieve Net Zero Energy by 2030.

Earlier this year, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) released a nonbinding resolution for a Green New Deal. The 14-page document outlines a sweeping set of goals related to greenhouse gas emissions, infrastructure investments, and labor markets--largely through a lens of justice and equity.

Synapse Energy Economics released a new report today on the opportunities and challenges for decarbonizing heating in California buildings. Our study, commissioned by the Natural Resources Defense Council, addresses the fact that California’s buildings are responsible for 25 percent of the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. More than half of those come from combustion furnaces and water heaters.